Seat of Wisdom
Latest Poem,  Sonnets for Heaven's Queen

Seat of Wisdom

O harp, that sat upon King David’s knee
As Jesus rested on His mother’s lap,
Was thy wood taken from the selfsame tree
Where Love would later bleed our human sap?

Thy lays prefigured Mary’s God-tuned heart,
Her finer resonance, her softer tone,
The diapason of Perfection’s art,
The star-born music that is hers alone.

O sweeter harp, that only One hath played,
Evoking purest passions from thy cords,
O instrument that Truth Himself hath made,
May thy celestial strains inspire my words!

That they should ring, with sonorous conceit,
To praise my King, enthroned on Widsom’s Seat.

From Sonnets for Heaven’s Queen © Joseph Charles MacKenzie. All rights reserved.

Joseph Charles MacKenzie is a traditional lyric poet of New Mexico. He is First Place winner of the Scottish International Poetry Competition (Times Literary Supplement, Jan 27, 2017) and a Pushcart Prize nominee. His verses have appeared in The New York Times, The Scotsman (Edinburgh), The Independent (London), US News and World Report, Google News, and many other outlets. He writes for Trinacria (New York) and the Society of Classical Poets (New York).

2 Comments

  • James A. Tweedie

    The connection between Mary and Wisdom (Sophia in Greek) is strong, insofar as it is one of the few feminine nouns ascribed to God. During my 2014 visit to Hagia Sophia (“Holy Wisdom”) in Istanbul I took pictures of three Byzantine mosaics representing Mary holding Jesus. In one she is standing, in the other two she is seated on a throne much as you describe in your sonnet. The image you evoke of Mary as an instrument of praise for Christ is lovely indeed, especially insofar as she serves as accompaniment to your own.

    • Joseph Charles MacKenzie - All Rights Reserved

      James A Tweedie is a prominent poet of the Society of Classical Poets who holds four earned degrees in Music, Humanities, Divinity and Ministry. Mr. Tweedie is also one of the most well travelled poets we have come across with a gift for historical scholarship, as his very kind remark shows.

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